New book in Dutch

Eet vet word slank

Eet vet word slank gepubliceerd januari 2013

In dit boek lees je o.a.: * heel veel informatie ter bevordering van je gezondheid; * hoe je door de juiste vetten te eten en te drinken kan afvallen; * hoe de overheid en de voedingsindustrie ons, uit financieel belang, verkeerd voorlichten; * dat je van bewerkte vetten ziek kan worden.

Trick and Treat:
How 'healthy eating' is making us ill
Trick and Treat cover

"A great book that shatters so many of the nutritional fantasies and fads of the last twenty years. Read it and prolong your life."
Clarissa Dickson Wright

Natural Health & Weight Loss cover

"NH&WL may be the best non-technical book on diet ever written"
Joel Kauffman, PhD, Professor Emeritus, University of the Sciences, Philadelphia, PA

Obesity in middle age increases dementia risk

Rachel A Whitmer, Erica P Gunderson, Elizabeth Barrett-Connor, et al. Obesity in middle age and future risk of dementia: a 27 year longitudinal population based study. BMJ 2005;330:1360



To evaluate any association between obesity in middle age, measured by body mass index and skinfold thickness, and risk of dementia later in life.


Analysis of prospective data from a multiethnic population based cohort.


Kaiser Permanente Northern California Medical Group, a healthcare delivery organisation.


10 276 men and women who underwent detailed health evaluations from 1964 to 1973 when they were aged 40-45 and who were still members of the health plan in 1994.

Main outcome measures

Diagnosis of dementia from January 1994 to April 2003. Time to diagnosis was analysed with Cox proportional hazard models adjusted for age, sex, race, education, smoking, alcohol use, marital status, diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, stroke, and ischaemic heart disease.


Dementia was diagnosed in 713 (6.9%) participants. Obese people (body mass index >30) had a 74% increased risk of dementia (hazard ratio 1.74, 95% confidence interval 1.34 to 2.26), while overweight people (body mass index 25.0-29.9) had a 35% greater risk of dementia (1.35, 1.14 to 1.60) compared with those of normal weight (body mass index 18.6-24.9). Compared with those in the lowest fifth, men and women in the highest fifth of the distribution of subscapular or tricep skinfold thickness had a 72% and 59% greater risk of dementia, respectively (1.72, 1.36 to 2.18, and 1.59, 1.24 to 2.04).


Obesity in middle age increases the risk of future dementia independently of comorbid conditions.


This finding is not unexpected. We know beyond doubt that obesity is caused by a diet that is rich in carbohydrates (sugars and starches, the 'healthy' diet). But there is also much evidence that a similar dietary regime increass the risk of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia). This study merely confirms what was already known.

What is also known is that the risk is greater in women than in men.

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